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Queens Assemblyman Daniel Rosenthal to resign from office this summer to begin new role at Jewish philanthropy organization

Jun. 14, 2023 By Carlotta Mohamed

After serving his constituents in central Queens for the past six years, Assemblyman Daniel Rosenthal announced on Wednesday, June 14, that he will be resigning from office this summer to begin a new role as vice president for Government Relations for the UJA-Federation of NY, the largest philanthropy organization in the world. 

Rosenthal will begin his new role in August. He will be overseeing key legislative priorities and the hundreds of nonprofits in its network, according to the UJA-Federation of NY. 

“It is with a mix of emotions that I announce my decision to step down from the New York state Assembly this summer,” Rosenthal said in a statement. “After much contemplation, I have come to the conclusion that it is time for me to embark upon a new chapter.”

The assemblyman said that he is honored to join the UJA-Federation and further his commitment to public service, as he works on public policy, social services, and combating anti-semitism. 

“This is an extraordinary opportunity to continue helping those in need, and I look forward to working with UJA’s nonprofit partners to help navigate the complexities of government and community affairs,” Rosenthal said. 

Eric Goldstein, CEO of the UJA-Federation of NY, said Rosenthal has a “stellar record” and will “play a vital role” in helping the organization secure government support for critical communal needs — including security for Jewish institutions, funding for senior services and holocaust survivors, safety net resources for the vulnerable, and more.  

“Daniel also excels at bringing diverse communities together, and this experience will be a huge asset to New Yorkers at a time of sharply rising antisemitism and hate crimes across our community,” Goldstein said.

Rosenthal is a Democratic member of the state Assembly representing a heavily-Jewish community in Central Queens. He represents Assembly District 27 which includes the neighborhoods of Kew Gardens Hills, Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, College Point, Whitestone, Malba and Pomonok. 

Serving as the youngest sitting representative in the state Legislature, Rosenthal said his team has worked with one goal in mind: to make government work better for New Yorkers. 

“I’m proud to say that our office took this directive to heart and made it our core mission. My team is proud of their commitment to constituent services and delivered assistance readily. We have had the pleasure of serving thousands of constituents by securing government resources, providing government assistance during natural and health disasters, funding public institutions, and being an active voice in government,” Rosenthal said. “We’ve delivered over $10 million in funding for our local schools and libraries and local communal organizations. We’ve passed legislation to make medication more affordable and safer, combating rising hate crimes, and tackling food insecurity.” 

In April, Rosenthal announced the passage of his bill, Hate Crime Reporting on College Campuses (A.3694), which will require colleges that receive state funding to modernize and enhance their disclosure of hate crimes that occur on campus. 

The assemblyman has also hosted Mayor Eric Adams, NYPD Commissioner Sewell and other top city officials for a town hall discussion on how to tackle the drastic rise in hate-related attacks against Jewish New Yorkers. 

As lawmakers become embroiled in the ongoing Israeli/Palestinian conflict, Rosenthal has expressed support for Israel and recently denounced a bill aimed at barring New York-based charitable groups from engaging in unauthorized support of Israeli settlement activity. 

Rosenthal said the bill, Not on Our Dime!: Ending New York Funding of Israeli Settler Violence Act, would “punish Jewish organizations that provide aid to the needy and emergency care for victims of terrorism.” 

In his district, Rosenthal has advocated for the preservation of the historic Lefferts Boulevard Bridge, safeguarding a neighborhood landmark, as well as protecting the livelihoods of local small businesses. 

In 2018, Rosenthal helped secure a $20.5 million investment for the Pomonok Houses to ensure that no resident experiences a lack of heat or water. The assemblyman has worked on legislation that preserves affordable housing and addresses cost of living concerns in New York City. 

Prior to his role as an assemblymember, Rosenthal worked as a City Council district director for former Councilman Rory Lancman. He is a graduate of Lander College for Men and resides in Kew Gardens Hills with his wife and family.

The assemblyman expressed his “deepest appreciation” to his colleagues in the legislature and his community, family, staff, and his constituents for entrusting him to be their voice in the state Assembly.

“Thank you again for the trust you have placed in me. Together, we have made a difference, and I am grateful to have been a part of this journey with you,” Rosenthal said. 

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