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Colorful Cows Can be Found Grazing in Queens

Baby Girl is on display at the New York Hall of Science in Queens (Artist: Jody Morlock)

Aug. 25, 2021 By Allie Griffin

Twenty colorful, painted cows have popped up in Queens and will be auctioned off for a good cause next month.

The 20 fiberglass cow figurines are among 78 spread throughout locations across the five boroughs as part of “CowParade” — an exhibit was last held in the the city 21 years ago.

The life-sized cows were designed by more than 70 artists and were placed in eight different locations on Aug. 18. The exhibit was originally planned for 2020, but was rescheduled due to the pandemic.

The majority of the Queens herd are on display at the New York Hall of Science in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. One cow, sponsored by the Rockaway Hotel, is on display at Rockaway Beach on the boardwalk at Beach 108th Street.

The 20 cows are painted in a rainbow of colors and patterns and include an animal print cow, a bee covered cow, a space cow, a birthday cake cow, a heart cow and a graffiti cow among others.

They will be on display until Sept. 30, at which point they’ll be individually auctioned to benefit God’s Love We Deliver, a charity that prepares and delivers meals to people living with serious illnesses like cancer and AIDS. The auction will be held fully online for the full month of September.

The first CowParade auction in 2000 raised $1.35 million for six charities including God’s Love, according to the New York Times.

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