You are reading

Five Men Beat and Rob 59-Year-Old on Flushing Street Last Week: NYPD

The five suspects wanted by police (NYPD)

Sept. 28, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Police are searching for a group of five men who beat up and robbed a 59-year-old man on a Flushing street last week.

The group approached the victim while he was walking in front of 146-17 32nd Ave. and assaulted him at around 6:10 p.m. on Sept. 23, according to police.

The suspects then stole his wallet before fleeing the scene southbound along 146th Street, cops said.

The victim was transferred to New York Presbyterian Hospital with a broken nose and facial fractures, police said.

The police did not provide a description of the suspects–such as their approximate age.

Anyone with information in regard to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782).
The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the CrimeStoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or on Twitter @NYPDTips. All calls are strictly confidential.

The alleged crime took place outside 146-17 32nd Ave. (Google Maps)

email the author: [email protected]

2 Comments

Click for Comments 
Concerned citizen

Hate crime. Report the truth. Where are our local officials speaking up about crime against Asians? And why are we afraid to document the color/race of these vermin?

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

What the Five Ballot Proposal Questions Mean for New Yorkers this November

The city is not just choosing a new mayor in November. This fall, New York voters must also decide on five proposed changes to the state constitution.

Five ballot proposals are up for a vote in the general election on Nov. 2. They include questions on the future of political representation in Albany, environmental protections, easier voter registration and absentee balloting, and how New York’s civil courts function.The full text of the five proposals are listed on the Board of Elections website and at Ballotpedia, the nonprofit political encyclopedia. But voters who aren’t political mavens may need a bit of context: