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Hochul Lifts Mask Mandates on Mass Transit

Masked riders on the subway (Photo: Queens Post)

Sept. 7, 2022 By Christian Murray

The state’s mask mandate for public transit has been lifted, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced Wednesday.

Hochul said the state will immediately end masking rules on subways, buses, Metro-North and the Long Island Rail Road. The new policy also applies to airports, for-hire vehicles, correctional facilities, detention centers and homeless shelters.

The governor said that while the masks are no longer required, their use should be encouraged. Signs will be posted on the subway and in transit areas that will promote mask use but make clear that they are optional.

“We have to restore some normalcy to our lives,” Hochul said, noting that the masks are now optional.

“If you choose not to have a mask, it’s your own risk assessment. You make your own determination but do not judge your fellow passengers on what their choices are.”

Officials had stopped enforcing the mask requirement some time ago and people had largely stopped adhering to the rule.

The mask mandate was first put in place in April 2020 by Hochul’s predecessor, Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Masks, however, must still be worn in hospitals and adult care facilities, such as nursing homes.

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