You are reading

Take a Walking Tour Around Flushing Creek, Learn About Its History, Pollution and Future Development

Flushing Creek (Photo: Dept. of City Planning)

May 24, 2021 By Christina Santucci

An artist and member of the Guardians of Flushing Bay – a coalition of community members, environmentalists and non-motorized boaters – will lead a walking tour of the area around Flushing Creek next month.

The event is scheduled to take place June 19 from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m., starting at the Mets-Willets Point subway station.

Cody Herrmann will guide participants on a two-mile walk through Willets Point to Flushing Creek – a one-mile-long waterway with Willets Point to the west and Flushing to the east that ends in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Attendees will discuss water quality, local history and plans for new developments in Willets Point and downtown Flushing.

Flushing Creek (GMaps)

In Willets Point, the city is finalizing a deal to lease six acres of land to Queens Development Group, LLC – a joint venture between Stephen Ross’ Related Companies and Sterling Equities, a real estate company that previously owned the Mets.

Plans include construction of 1,100 affordable apartments, public open space and a new public elementary school.

Meanwhile, the City Council voted to approve zoning changes in December for a special waterfront district in Flushing – alongside Flushing Creek – which would include 1,725 apartments, 879 hotel rooms, office and retail space, as well as a brand new road network. A coalition of Flushing-based community groups, however, has filed a lawsuit against several city agencies and the City Council over the plan.

Next month’s walking tour is being held in conjunction with the Guardians of Flushing Bay and Queens Museum’s exhibition, “Art As Social Action: 10 Years of Social Practice Queens.”

Hermann is one of several artists whose work is included in the exhibit, which emphasizes the intersection of art and social justice and runs through July 25. She is also an activist and a board member and chair of the community engagement committee with the Guardians of Flushing Bay.

Organizers of the walking tour noted that masks and close-toed shoes are required for attendees. Parts of the route will include areas with uneven and sandy ground.

Attendance is limited to 25 people, and registration is first come, first served.

email the author: [email protected]

One Comment

Click for Comments 
Ralph

A real shame, the history of this creek is an environmental nightmare. I hope they’re seriously going to rehabilitate it and it’s going to cost a lot.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

College Point building inspector criminally charged with taking bribes to close complaints: DA

A College Point man who works as an inspector at the city’s Department of Buildings is accused of accepting bribes in exchange for overlooking potential violations at various Queens locations on multiple occasions since January 2023.

Zabihullah Ibrahimi, 42, of 22nd Avenue, was arraigned Thursday in Queens Criminal Court on bribery and official misconduct charges for taking cash from homeowners and then closing complaints about their property. In one case, he allegedly asked for $3,500 from a property owner and, when she said she had no cash, he directed her to go to a bank and get it while he waited at her home, according to Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz.

Op-ed: An urgent call for revising NY’s criminal justice reforms to protect public safety

Apr. 11, 2024 By Council Member Robert Holden

In 2019, the State Legislature and Governor Andrew Cuomo embarked on a controversial overhaul of New York’s criminal justice system by enacting several laws, including cashless bail and sweeping changes to discovery laws. Simultaneously, the New York City Council passed laws that compounded these challenges, notably the elimination of punitive segregation in city jails and qualified immunity for police officers. These actions have collectively undermined public safety and constrained law enforcement effectiveness.