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Thief Steals $70,000 Cash From College Point Home: NYPD

Vicinity of 117 Street and 12 Avenue (Google Maps) and picture of suspect (NYPD Crimestoppers)

May 29, 2019 By Meghan Sackman

A thief made off with $70,000 cash and other belongings from a College Point home in a burglary over the weekend, according to authorities.

Police say the suspect forced his way into the residency, a house located in the vicinity of 117 Street and 12 Avenue, around 3:24 a.m. on May 25, through a secured side window.

The thief stole $70,000 in cash, two watches, a safe with personal papers, and three pieces of luggage before exiting the front door and fleeing in an unknown direction.

Police from the 109 Precinct are offering an award of up to $2,500 for information on the suspect.

The suspect is described by police as being black, between 30 and 40 years old and was last seen wearing a hooded sweatshirt.

Anyone with information on the case should contact the Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-8477, or text CRIMES and then enter TIP577, or visit www.nypdcrimestoppers.com.

 

email the author: news@queenspost.com

11 Comments

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Pa Ingalls

This was probably a store owner who didn’t get to the bank that day and the culprit might be either a worker or a shopper who frequents the store. He seemed to know what he was doing.

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Richard Romano

He’ll need it for his lawyer. Had half his mug shot done now look straight ahead. Inside job OH YEAh

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Boxerdrillz

By this time this is all typed out, chances are that he’s already nabbed. #cameraseverywhere

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ralph

Damn… why would anyone keep that much cash on hand? It’s like begging to be robbed?

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Anonymous

They may be drug dealers. That may be what was in the suit cases, weed or coke why else take three of them.

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Pa Ingalls

Ehh. From my experience, most drug dealers have pit bulls as “employees”. No way.

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princess

Had to be an inside job. Who else would know how much cash is kept in the home?

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ralph

Probably. But sometimes, it’s a ‘loose lips sinks ships’ kind of thing. Someone could have been boasting or mouthing off about it in front of the wrong ears; and it could have been something as innocent as ‘our whole family is vacationing in Mexico for a week! Isn’t that great?’ Something I always tell my kids; never talk with anyone (even best friends as they can spill the beans too) about ‘your house is empty’ plans until AFTER you get back.

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