You are reading

Voters Approve $4.2B in Climate Spending and 3 Equity Measures in NYC

An absentee ballot box at an early voting site at Hudson Yards. Ben Fractenberg/THE CITY

Logo for THE CITY

This article was originally published by The CITY on Nov. 10

New York City voters approved four ballot measures this year, approving new funding for statewide environmental projects and three local proposals aimed at boosting racial equity in the five boroughs.

By a wide margin, voters in the city and across the state approved the Environmental Bond Act — Proposal 1 on this year’s ballot — which gives the go-ahead for the state to borrow $4.2 billion to pay for a number of projects to protect New York from more extreme weather due to climate change.

It includes improvements to stormwater systems, funding for wastewater infrastructure upgrades, wetland protections and switching to zero-emission school buses.

Statewide, 60 percent of voters approved Proposal 1 as of late Tuesday night. In New York City, a slightly higher margin, 81 percent, voted yes, according to city Board of Elections tallies.

The results are no big surprise to history buffs: New York state voters have approved statewide ballot measures 70 percent of the time since 1985, Ballotpedia has tallied.

About 7 in 10 city voters also said yes to three ballot questions proposed by former Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Racial Justice Commission, or RJC, formed in response to the widespread protests of racism and police brutality in the summer of 2020.

Those measures — Proposals 2, 3 and 4 on the ballot — will do three things:

—Change the preamble of the city charter to include a statement of values to create a “just and equitable city for all.”
—Mandate that all city agencies create racial equity plans every two years and establish a new Office of Racial Equity to coordinate that planning.
—Ensure that the city government uses a new way of calculating the “true cost of living” without including public assistance as income. The RJC advocated for this change because it said the city’s current poverty measure did not accurately reflect household costs and, therefore, skewed the picture for policymakers.

All four proposals take effect immediately.

THE CITY is an independent, nonprofit news outlet dedicated to hard-hitting reporting that serves the people of New York.

email the author: news@queenspost.com
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Five Queens startups win $20,000 each in 2024 Tech + Innovation Challenge

May. 19, 2024 By Czarinna Andres

A diverse range of businesses, including a yoga studio, an olive oil distributor, a female health care provider, a sustainable mushroom farmer, and an AI-powered physical therapy service, have been named winners of the 2024 Queens Tech + Innovation Challenge (QTIC). Each winner will receive a $20,000 grant to support their business operations.

QBP Richards, advocates rally to demand Mayor Adams restore funding to City’s libraries

May. 17, 2024 By Gabriele Holtermann

A rally was held at the Queens Public Library at Forest Hills on May 16, during which Queens Borough President Donovan Richards, Queens Public Library President and CEO Dennis Walcott, union reps and library advocates called on Mayor Eric Adams to reverse the proposed $58.3 million budget cuts to the New York Public Library (NYPL), the Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), and the Queens Public Library (QBL) for Fiscal Year 2025, which begins on July 1, 2024.

Queens elected officials secure $70 million from New York State Budget for school safety equipment in religious and independent schools

May. 17, 2024 By Anthony Medina

Religious and independent schools throughout the city will soon receive additional funding for school safety equipment, thanks to Assemblymember Andrew Hevesi and State Senator Michael Gianaris, who, after extensive advocacy efforts, successfully secured $70 million from the New York State Budget for 2024-25 for Non-Public School Safety Equipment (NPSE) grants.