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Woman Subject to Racist Rant on Rego Park Street: NYPD

Suspect and Google

April 27, 2020 By Christian Murray

The police have released photos of a man who taunted a woman with racial slurs in Rego Park yesterday.

The suspect allegedly approached a 36-year-old woman in the vicinity of Wetherole and 66th Avenue at around 11:45 a.m. and made a number of anti-Asian statements pertaining to COVID-19.

The woman attempted to take photos of the suspect on her cell phone but it was slapped out of her hand. The phone fell to the pavement and shattered.

The man then fled the scene on foot westbound on Wetherole Street.

The suspect is described as white, with a salt and pepper beard and mustache. He was last seen wearing a white baseball cap, a white hooded sweater, white sweatpants and white sneakers.

The incident is part of a surge in anti-Asian attacks that have taken place since the outbreak of COVID-19. Last month, a 47-year-old man and his son were the subject of anti-Asian statement on Queens Boulevard at 70th Ave.

“You f–king Chinese,” the racist reportedly shouted at the man before pushing him in the face. “Where’s your f–king mask.”

In another incident, a 59-year-old Asian man was kicked in the back — which knocked him to the ground– by a teenager in Manhattan.

Anyone with information in regard to Sunday’s incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782).

Suspect (NYPD)

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4 Comments

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Isaac Chiang

Thanks to the president who stirred up this negative sentiment. Asians are just like any one else, we are in the same hot water like any other New Yorker.

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James

I will say this is disgusting and that the guy is a piece of garbage, but why are things like this not reported when it happens to whites, Asians and others that walk through African American neighborhoods. They harass and make racial remarks to non-blacks on a daily basis and nothing is done about it.

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Human PhD

Not sure if you’re speaking from personal experience but I can only remember one time being yelled at for being Asian in recent memory and that was by a white homeless bum on the subway. I’ve work 7 days a week for the past 6 years in a black and Dominican neighborhood and have had zero issues. Get with the times.

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Alan Goon

I am a Chinese American that was growing up in the 60’s. The United States of America was at war with its third East Asian country. The words the kids would call me at that time hurt. But as I grew up. It made me a better person. And understand why, because people just don’t know any better.

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