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Woman’s Decomposed Body Found Wrapped in Trash Bags in Corona Apartment

A 68-year-old woman’s body was found inside an apartment at 34-21 102nd St. in Corona Wednesday (Google Maps)

Sept. 16, 2021 By Michael Dorgan

A 68-year-old woman’s decomposed body was found inside a Corona apartment Wednesday evening, police said.

Police and the FDNY came across the grisly sight at around 6:40 p.m. after responding to a 911 call about a water leak inside a residence at 34-21 102nd St.

Cops discovered the woman’s decomposed body lying on the living room floor wrapped in trash bags. EMS responded to the scene and pronounced her dead at the location, police said.

The woman’s 45-year-old daughter was in the apartment when police arrived. She was discovered in a disoriented state in the shower. She was transported to NYC Health & Hospitals/Elmhurst for treatment and evaluation, police said.

An NYPD spokesperson said it was unclear how the 68-year-old woman died and how long she had been dead.

The Medical Examiner will ultimately determine the cause of death, police said.

Police said that the landlord of the apartment reported the water leak and the FDNY had to break down the front door of the residence to gain entry.

The deceased woman’s name has not been released, pending family notification.

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